Design

Explore our Interactive Map to find out more about the proposed Glenellen Solar Farm.

If you would like to provide feedback or a suggestion, please do so using the Submission Form below.   Contributions will be considered as part of efforts to finalise the Project’s Design.

Proposed Site Layout

Glenellen Map
Site selection Construction Visual impact Visual screening Agricultural land use Tree removal Biodiversity Property value Existing substation Perimeter fence Visual screening Flood Solar panels Site access Cultural heritage Glint/glare Visual impact Transport Microclimate Bushfire Setback Setback Visual screening

Site selection

To be effective, solar must be developed close to areas where there is customer demand for energy.  This location provides ready access to the growing regional population of Greater Hume, as well as business and industry in Sydney and Melbourne.

Electrical infrastructure (substation) already exists at the site. The site was also selected due to the limited environmental and social constraints identified.

Construction

Construction activities will be undertaken predominantly during daylight hours from 7am – 6pm Monday to Friday, 8am – 1pm on Saturday.

Visual impact

The Project has relatively confined visibility due to level topography and existing woody vegetation. The site will be most visible from paddocks to the North East and elevated areas to the South East. Views from these locations are generally buffered by distance and vegetation. Distant views and glimpses of the Site are possible from Blight Road East, Walla-Walla-Jindera Road, Dights Forest Road, Urana Road, Lindner Road, Glenellen Road, and Gerogery Road.

The overall impact of the Project on the rural landscape character has been assessed as Low.

Visual screening

New vegetation buffer plantings are proposed in places where views of the solar farm may be of concern to near neighbours. These plantings will utilise native trees and shrubs known to grow well in this area and will greatly reduce views of the solar farm for households immediately adjacent to the site.

Agricultural land use

Solar farms are considered an appropriate development within the region as they do not permanently remove the land from future agricultural use and support employment in rural areas.

The site itself will host sheep grazing / farming when the solar farm is built. When operations cease, the site will be returned to agricultural use. Subsequently, the site will be managed to ensure the quality of the land is preserved for farming to resume at some point in the future.

Tree removal

The Project will unavoidably impact up to 13.13 ha of native vegetation and 80 paddock trees. Clearing will not be undertaken until inspections are conducted by qualified ecologists and any wildlife is relocated.

Measures to limit activity in vegetation adjacent to residential areas will be implemented to protect flora and fauna surrounding the Project. Measures will include signage, fencing and pest & disease management.

Biodiversity

Field studies have found no threatened flora or fauna species within the Project footprint. However, as a precaution, potential habitat for Myotis macropus (Southern Myotis) listed as vulnerable and Pilularia novae-hollandiae (Austral Pillwort) listed as Endangered have been assumed to be present based on-site characteristics.

One Critically Endangered Ecological Community listed under the NSW Act - the ‘White Box Yellow Box Blakely’s Red Gum Woodland’ –occurs at the site.

The Project has been designed in a way as to avoid and minimise impacts wherever possible to these biodiversity features. Offset credits will be acquired to account for removal of 4.46ha of native plant communities that will be removed if the Project proceeds.

Sediment and weed control measures will be implemented to control the quality of released water and reduce the likelihood of weed infestations.

Property value

A carefully designed solar farm in a rural area, which includes mitigation measures to neighbouring properties, is not expected to have a major impact on property values in its vicinity.

Existing substation

A high voltage TransGrid substation is already located on the Site. By connecting to this substation the Project will deliver clean energy to the NSW grid without the need for new overhead poles and wires.

Perimeter fence

To ensure safety and security, a chain link fence up to 2.5m high will be installed around the perimeter of the Project. This fence will run behind new tree plantings that will be established to
further improve visual outlook.

Visual screening

New vegetation buffer plantings are proposed in places where views of the solar farm may be of concern to near neighbours. These plantings will utilise native trees and shrubs known to grow well in this area and will greatly reduce views of the solar farm for households immediately adjacent to the site.

Flood

While some portions of the site are flood prone, modelling indicates that the Project is unlikely to influence flood risks to surrounding lands under existing conditions and future climate change scenarios.

Significant streams and riparian corridors on the site will be excluded from the development footprint and dams will be retained to provide water for livestock.

Solar panels

Solar panels, arranged in rows, capture sunlight and convert this into electricity. Modern solar farms utilise technology that enables panels to operate in low light or cloudy conditions, and to ‘track’ the sun, significantly increasing the amount of solar energy they harness.

The Project will use Mono-crystalline silicon solar cells with the capability to capture light from both sides of the solar panels. Up to 416,000 panels will be installed at the site.

Site access

The proposed main site access point will be located along where Ortlipp Road flanks the western boundary of the Site, near an existing access point adjacent to the substation.

Cultural heritage

A field assessment found three discrete locations of Aboriginal stone artefacts on the site. These were classified as Moderately to Highly Disturbed due to previous ploughing and grazing of the land. Artefacts are therefore considered to have low local significance. Regardless, collection of these artefacts in partnership with the local Registered Aboriginal Party is proposed prior to any works commencing.

Glint/glare

Solar farms are not considered to be reflective, since panels are designed to absorb as much sunlight as possible to convert into electricity. ‘Worst Case Scenario’ modelling suggests reflections off the panels may be possible immediately after sunrise until no later than 8 am at ten nearby dwellings. Vegetation screening will reduce this potential impact to a level where it is no longer significant.

Visual impact

The Project has relatively confined visibility due to level topography and existing woody vegetation. The site will be most visible from paddocks to the North East and elevated areas to the South East. Views from these locations are generally buffered by distance and vegetation. Distant views and glimpses of the Site are possible from Blight Road East, Walla-Walla-Jindera Road, Dights Forest Road, Urana Road, Lindner Road, Glenellen Road, and Gerogery Road.

The overall impact of the Project on the rural landscape character has been assessed as Low.

Transport

To avoid heavy vehicle traffic through Jindera it is proposed that the main access route to the site will be via Ortlipp Road. During construction, heavy item haulage will come off the Hume Highway and via Olympic Highway, Gerogery Road, Glenellen Road, Walla Walla Jindera Road (Southbound), Lindner Road and Ortlipp Road from the south. During construction, around 45 heavy vehicle, 40 light vehicle and 13 bus trips are likely to made to the site each day. During operations the number of vehicle trips to site will 10 or fewer.

Microclimate

The Project will use tracking technology – with solar panels spaced at a wider distance and rotated to follow the sun – therefore avoiding ‘trapping’ heat underneath. Temperature increases may be detectable in the air directly above the solar panels; it is unlikely though, that there will be any heat impacts beyond the perimeter of the Project.

Soil moisture levels are not expected to change. Depending on climate and season, shading from solar panels may reduce soil temperatures by 0-2°C thereby reducing evaporation and soil moisture loss.

Bushfire

Trina will work closely with local emergency services to properly assess bushfire risks and management strategies. Mitigation measures at the solar farm site – such as Asset Protection Zones, water supply and permanent firefighting equipment – will be included in planning controls.

Setback

A generous setback of the development has been included in the design at the request of neighbours to reduce impacts such as visual impact, noise and dust.

Setback

A generous setback of the development has been included in the design at the request of neighbours to reduce impacts such as visual impact, noise and dust.

Visual screening

New vegetation buffer plantings are proposed in places where views of the solar farm may be of concern to near neighbours. These plantings will utilise native trees and shrubs known to grow well in this area and will greatly reduce views of the solar farm for households immediately adjacent to the site.

Existing native trees, shrubs and dam in this location will be retained to provide vegetation screening for adjacent homestead, approx. 4km away at an elevated position.

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